Leaving a legacy to Woodcraft Folk

For over ninety years, Woodcraft Folk has been working with children and young people with the aim of building a world based on equality, friendship, peace and social justice.

As an organisation rooted in the co-operative movement, we are determined to communicate to younger generations a simple message: that co-operation rather than competition is the way to a better future.

Our organisation has been built on the voluntary efforts of many thousands of people, who have offered both their time and their money to help develop our work.

Now we are engaged in a major new development drive to carry forward our message towards our 100th birthday in 2025. If you have considered making a gift to the Woodcraft Folk in your will, we hope that this short web page will answer any questions you may have.

Making a will

It is difficult in the hectic pressures of everyday life to take time to think about a will. However, the process of writing a will need not be complicated or time-consuming. Most people choose to ask a solicitor to help, and many solicitors will charge a small set fee for help with drafting a simple will.

If you die intestate (that is, without making a will), your goods and money are distributed to your family members according to set legal guidelines. This may not be the way you would have chosen to see your assets distributed. It also means that friends who are not relatives are likely to miss out.

Helping Woodcraft Folk

As a charity, Woodcraft Folk benefits from the automatic tax exemption which exists on legacies to charities in cases where Inheritance Tax is payable.

A gift to the general benefit of the Woodcraft Folk’s charitable aims will be used to best effect, in the area of our work where the need is currently greatest. It provides an enduring way of helping to support our aims and principles into the future.

Types of gift

You may decide that you want to give a particular amount of money, or perhaps a specific item which you own, to Woodcraft Folk. You will find suitable wording for these types of gifts below.

Or you may want to arrange for a part or all of the residue of your estate to be given to Woodcraft Folk. The residue is the amount left over, after other legacies and bequests have been made. Because the value of a residuary gift is not affected by inflation, this sort of gift is particularly appreciated. Once again you will find the wording to use below.

A gift for a specific purpose

If you want to consider giving a gift to Woodcraft Folk for a particular purpose, the Woodcraft Folk Treasurer will be happy to talk to you or your solicitor at any time, and also to provide guidance to avoid any potential difficulties.

Leaving the decision to your executors

Some people arrange for part of their estate to be left to charitable causes, but leave it up to their executors (the people who you ask to execute the will on your behalf) to decide which organisations to support. If you choose this route, you may like to make sure that your executors know of your interest in the work of Woodcraft Folk.

If you have already made a will

It is easy to arrange to add an extra instruction, known as a codicil, to your will. It is sensible to consult a solicitor over the precise wording to use. We include an example of a typical codicil in this article.

Wording to use for a residuary bequest

“I give the residue* of my estate to Woodcraft Folk charity number 1148195 (Scottish charity SC039791) of Unit 9, 83 Crampton Street, London SE17 3BQ for its charitable purposes. I direct that the receipt of the Treasurer or other proper officer of Woodcraft Folk shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors.” (* OR: I give a half / third / etc share of the residue of my estate)

Wording to use for a gift of money

“I give the sum of £............... (in figures and words) to Woodcraft Folk charity number 1148195 (Scottish charity SC039791), of Unit 9, 83 Crampton Street, London SE17 3BQ for its charitable purposes. I direct that the receipt of the Treasurer or other proper officer of Woodcraft Folk shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors.”

Wording to use for a gift of property or assets

“I give my (description of item and location) to Woodcraft Folk charity number 1148195 (Scottish charity SC039791) of Unit 9, 83 Crampton Street, London SE17 3BQ for its charitable purposes. I direct that the receipt of the Treasurer or other proper officer of Woodcraft Folk shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors”

Codicil (to add a new item to an existing will)

Typical wording of a codicil. (Please consult a solicitor):

“This is the first codicil to the will dated (date of original in words) of me (full name) of (your address).

I give the sum of £ .............(in figures and words) to Woodcraft Folk charity number 1148195 (Scottish charity SC039791) of Unit 9, 83 Crampton Street, London SE17 3BQ for its charitable purposes.

I direct that the receipt of the Treasurer or other proper officer of Woodcraft Folk shall be a sufficient discharge to my executors. In all other respects I confirm my Will.

Date: (current date)

Signature: Signed by (your name) in our presence and by us”

(signatures, names, addresses and occupations of two witnesses, who are not beneficiaries of your will)

Caution: the rules for the way a will is signed and witnessed are very important and if not followed correctly may make a will invalid.

Further information on leaving a charitable gift in your will may be found at
https://www.gov.uk/donating-to-charity/leaving-gifts-to-charity-in-your-will
and  https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/the-tax-benefits-of-giving-to-charity.

We strongly suggest that you consult a solicitor when writing your will - we are unable to provide professional advice.